What You Need To Know About Restraining Orders In New Jersey 

When an individual feels threatened by another party, steps may be taken to secure legal protections. Courts issue restraining orders, legally binding and enforceable directives that place restrictions on the named party that prevent him or her from contacting or physically being within a certain distance of the individual who obtained the order.

Prior to the issuance of a permanent restraining order, an individual may seek to obtain immediate protections via a temporary restraining order. A temporary restraining order (TRO) is a court order put in place when a party seeking the order provides compelling testimony as to why a permanent restraining order may be warranted.

Temporary Restraining Orders

While the court considers more evidence in the case., a TRO may be issued. In most cases, a TRO is valid and enforceable for only a few days, until a hearing can be held to determine whether it should become a permanent restraining order. Generally, the main requirement for a temporary restraining order is that the party requesting the TRO will be immediately harmed in some way — such as financially or physically — if the other party is not restrained.

Other requirements for a temporary restraining order are typically procedural, such as if the requesting party or the attorney for that party needs to submit the proper paperwork to provide details of the harm that might occur if the TRO is not issued.

Standing Up For You And Your Rights

If you are the subject of a TRO or permanent restraining order, you may experience significant personal and financial losses as a result of the order. The attorneys at Deitch and Perone, P.C. in Monmouth County, can help you defend your rights and position and take action to prove why either a temporary or permanent restraining order is not needed. Call our firm today at our West Long Branch office at 732-440-9887 or our Scotch Plains office at 908-264-2067 or contact us online.